Mozzarella & Co

Here at Pinsarella freshly and locally hand made Mozzarella and other Fresh Italian Cheese

Pinsarella Pinsa & Mozzarella Freshly Hand Made

The term mozzarella derives from the verb to cut, to cut with the hands the Cheese mozzarella when it is still warm so as to form some balls like the beloved mozzarella.
Mozzarella Is part of the family of pasta stretched fresh cheeses.
The most famous of mozzarella is buffalo
mozzarella, This cheese deriving from buffalo milk that is made only in some parts of Italy. The other kinds of mozzarella deriving from cow milk. The thing that really characterizes the mozzarella is the traditional manufacturing process.
Process to making mozzarella

  • Acidification and coagulation: this become when you add natural grafting serum in milk of 33/39 ° C The milk is incubated with a whey starter containing thermophilic
    bacteria. Then rennet is added to form the curds.
  • Filatura of the cheese mozzarella curd
    The curds are heated in water or whey until they form strings (hence the term "string cheese") and become elastic
    in texture. Shipping hand made ball shaping When the cheese is elastic and still heat. And after that We Enjoy it !

Pinsarella philosophy: Freshly Hand Made. Here at  Pinsarella we think that to have the really fresh and quality
Italian food , we should not to import it, but make it.
For this reason we import expertise and Italian tradition
not food.
That’s why we Handmade mozzarella in front of you

Making the Stracciatella

Stracciatella is the luxurious filling of heavy cream and shards of fresh mozzarella.
The first step is to make a little mozzarella (you’re going to end up ripping it to pieces for the filling, so
consider this part of the process a blessedly low-stakes test run for later).
Add enough boiling water to submerge the curds; I just use a ladle to scoop the water out of a pasta
pot. With a large metal or wooden spoon, start stirring and pressing the curds together until they
cohere into a solid mass. The goal is to smush and stretch and fold the curd until there are no lumps
or tears and it looks smooth and glossy. If you just wanted to make mozzarella, you’d pinch this into a ball, put it in some cold water, and call it a day.
But who just wants mozzarella when you could have mozzarella filled with more mozzarella and whipping cream? Thought so. Stretch the hot mozzarella into a rope and tear it into thin strands like string cheese; the smaller you make them, the more cream they’ll absorb, which is what you want, so take your time).
You can leave those strands as is, rip them into little shreds, or even chop them with a knife. Toss them in a bowl, pour in most of the heavy cream, and (if you’re like me and salt your instant ramen) add more salt. Full disclosure (at the risk of undermining this entire article), eating stracciatella out of the bowl with a spoon like it’s goddam Cheerios is one of life’s greatest pleasures, so if you choose to get off at that
stop, I won’t be one to judge.
Alternatively, if you wanted to make flavored burrata, you could add things like truffle oil, pesto, or, um, chocolate milk to the mixture. Enter at your own risk. 

Making the Mozzarella
This is the outside of the burrata, the mozzarella pouch that will hold the filling that you somehow just resisted the temptation to pour directly into your mouth. Start with a half-pound of curd this time, then proceed exactly as above, smushing and stretching and folding the curds into a smooth, glossy ball, dumping and re-salting the water as you go. This time, instead of ripping the mozzarella apart, you’re going to flatten it into a disk-like pizza dough, pinching it into a roughly six-inch circle that’s a little fat in the middle and nice and thin around the edges. If it rips, no problem; just dip it back in the hot water, press it back together, and reshape it.